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nchristine
Jul 25, 2013

Why are channels “x+7” available for some WiFi networks?

I asked a question yesterday about choosing a wireless WiFi channel. Thanks for the help, btw! I downloaded WiFi Analyzer for my Android phone and installed inSSIDer on my PC. The two worked great together to not only identify a better channel than I was using, but also to learn that moving my AP about 3 feet made a huge difference in signal strength. However, when analyzing channels, there were a couple signals that were showing channel 11+7, which covered a large portion of the available channels (1-11). Mine didn’t. How are some people able to select a 7 channel spread?

jimlynch
08/05/2013
Some interesting info on wifi channels here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11#Channels_and_frequencies

"802.11b, 802.11g, and 802.11n-2.4 utilize the 2.400 – 2.500 GHz spectrum, one of the ISM bands. 802.11a and 802.11n use the more heavily regulated 4.915 – 5.825 GHz band. These are commonly referred to as the "2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands" in most sales literature. Each spectrum is sub-divided into channels with a center frequency and bandwidth, analogous to the way radio and TV broadcast bands are sub-divided.

The 2.4 GHz band is divided into 14 channels spaced 5 MHz apart, beginning with channel 1 which is centered on 2.412 GHz. The latter channels have additional restrictions or are unavailable for use in some regulatory domains."
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dthomas
07/25/2013

What you are seeing is the march of progress. They must have an 802.11n compliant AP. You probably have an 802.11g device.

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