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jluppino
Apr 01, 2013

Why were people upset about Google's Cesar Chavez doodle?

I honestly thought I was reading an April fool's joke when I first saw an article the Google had "create[d] controversy with Cesar Chavez doodle." Of course, since that was on Fox News, I would have treated that as a joke any day of the year. But then I also saw articles on the topic from reputable news sources, and realized that, yep, people are actually upset about it. First off, what logical basis for being mad at Google do they (or you) have? Cesar Chavez was a pretty imporatant figure who helped improve many peoples' lives. Secondly, if you are running a business, how do you respond to this sort of "controversy"?

jimlynch
04/02/2013
It was a rather odd decision by Google. They decided to inject politics into something directly and unnecessarily. Why did they do this? I have no idea. Chavez is a political figure, so perhaps Google was trying to project their sympathies with his ideas or politics? Only Google really knows what they were thinking.
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rousseau
04/02/2013

Google is an international company. It has customers in many countries that practice many religions, or none at all. Just a glance at Wikipedia shows that, in addition to Christians, there are 1.5 billion Muslims, 1.1 billion non-religious people, and 1 billion Hindus, in the world. If Google starts observing religious holidays in anything more than a secular manner (Santa at Christmas, for example), there are going to be people upset that either 1)Google is promoting a religion other than theirs,  or 2) Google is not promoting their religion sufficiently. 

 

Keep in mind that Easter is not celebrated on the same day by all sects, so an Easter Doodle on  the date Orthodox celebrate Easter might well result in angry reactions from Catholic followers. Cesar Chavez is a legitimate historical figure that helped improve the lives of many people. Choosing him for the Doodle avoids controversy except from people that feel private companies should acknowledge and honor their chosen religious beliefs (or, to be fair, perhaps feel that all religious faiths should be equally honored, and would appreciate it if Google also promotes evens such as Eid, Ramadan, Diwali, Rosh Hashanah, and the Winter Solstice, in addition to those of their own faith).  

 

 

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Jason Jahner
04/01/2013

Are you serious? It was Easter. Over a Billion people world wide celebrate the holy day and you are asking why people were upset that Google would rather celebrate someones birthday instead of that? Typical Liberal idiot. No common sense.

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