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ncharles
Jan 24, 2012

How well does HzO work and would it be worth the expense to implement its use with future hardware purchases?

HzO was one of the more interesting products shown at CES. If you missed it, HzO is a waterproofing treatment applied to hardware and essentially makes it, well, waterproof. It was pretty amazing to see a new iPhone submerged in water, yet continue to work perfectly. A non-business display of HzO was perhaps even more amazing - new white sneakers were covered with chocolate syrup, and the syrup just rolled off, leaving behind nothing but a memory. I've had to deal with employees' water damaged laptops, smartphones and tablets all too often, and some of those times important data was lost. I'm thinking of pushing for a test program to see how cost effective HzO treatment is for enterprise users, but I was hoping someone already has some experience with HzO.

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Cam65
02/08/2014
I got some of HZO's product from an employee that works there and thought I'd give it a try .. On my electrical hard ward old iPhone , old camera , laptop .. When I say old I mean 2 or three years old didn't dare use anything new.. Let's put it this way it slowed the water down .. So I'd recommend it in a splash or quick drop situation .. A few days later not good at all,, stopping water from getting in any unsealed area risky business If you ask me ...
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CoryBluffenberg_LinkedIUDK1S
01/25/2013

HZO PRODUCT FAILURE THINK TWICE BEFORE PURCHASING!! FAST FORWARD TO 1:20 AND WATCH THE SAMSUNG SCREEN POWERS DOWN AND HE PUTS IT BEHIND THE DEMO TANK.

If this happened once on camera, imagine the amount of times it has happened off camera! This technology is a joke!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pHTiJPKO1_M

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technolojohn_tw472869741
01/30/2012

In addition to this there is another company called P2i and they are already on electronic devices and have applied the technology to different industries as well including footwear: http://www.p2i.com

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henyfoxe
01/25/2012

 

From everything I've seen and read, it works pretty darn well.  I'm not sure how long it will be before it is widely available pre-applied to devices and what the total costs will be, but I'm certain that it will become less expensive over time.  There is another company, Liquipel, that provides a similar product/service, and can apply it to devices that you already own for about $60.  A video of an treated iPhone and a tank of water is imbedded in an article about HzO. http://www.pcworld.com/article/243827/hzo_nanotechnology_seal_keeps_smar...

 

I can't help but wonder what other applications this technology could be used for.  How much could it cost to treat car windshields, for instance?  Or what would happen if the hull of a boat was treated?  Or clothing?  I hope that we get to find out the answers in the near future. 

 

jimlynch
01/24/2012
It sounds like a great product, particularly for those on the go. Who wouldn't want a laptop or tablet or phone that was protected from water damage? I think people with kids would also appreciate it, I'm sure there are a fair number of hardware devices that have had water/soda/whatever spilled into them by children.

I suppose it will really depend on how much cost it adds to a product. If they can make the cost minimal then I think it would definitely be worth it for many products. On the other hand, if it jacks up costs significantly then I think it will be relegated to niche markets rather than becoming widely used across entire product lines.

Still, what an interesting and innovative idea. A good thing to watch and see what happens.
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