S
SilverHawk
Aug 31, 2011

Can I switch out my Wifi G for Wifi N?

I have a cable modem/router from AT&T but it's only Wifi G. Is it difficult to set up another Wifi device that uses 802.11N to replace the wifi from the cable company? Which one should I use? This is for home not the office, about 3-4 computers total. I don't want to spend $100 if I don't have to.

j
jobeard
09/30/2013

Given you have Modem==Router(wifi-g) and the router doesn't support N mode, you need a second router.

 

Setup the new WiFi-N router to

  • disable it from using DHCP
  • set the wifi to use N mode only
  • set the default address to the same as the WiFi-g BUT change the last number from 1 to 254
  • (hint: the WiFi-g will be at x.x.x.1 and the WiFi-N at x.x.x.254)
  • set the SSID of this router similar to the other (but Say add -N as a suffix)
  • use the same network password as the WiFi-g
  • save the configuration
  •  

    Now cable  WiFi-g(lan port) with rj45 cable to WiFi-N(lan port) and leave WiFi-N WAN port empty.

     

    Results:

    WiFi-g will provide all DHCP services for both G/N wifi connections

    as well as all wired connections (regardless of where connected).

     

    Connections to the -N ssid will use the N mode settings

     

    z
    zeeman
    08/31/2011

    Swapping out your cable modem can be a problem. I found this out with Comcast - every time I wanted to make a change to my home network, or performed a reset, I'd have to call up Comcast to get "re-authorized". Sometimes they would change the DHCP address assigned to my modem, then I'd have to call them again to get re-authorized. In the end, I would have been happier just sticking with their stupid Wifi G.

    T
    TheCount
    08/31/2011

    I'm not sure you'll run into the same problem he did if you're on AT&T. But you don't need to replace the whole modem, just the wifi part. And you don't need the router part either, so just get a Wifi N accesspoint. I've seen them on Newegg for $35 or so.

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