Jan 28, 2015

How does application virtualization differ from virtual containers?

I have heard about application virtualization. What exactly is it and how does it differ from virtual containers?
Best answer
01/29/2015
App virtualization has been around for quite some time with products from Symantec and Microsoft, among others. The idea is that like virtual computers, you insert a small hypervisor layer that allows you to run a variety of apps in their own virtual sessions, protected from the rest of the operating system. The idea never really caught on because the virtual apps were a pain to configure.

Containers, such as Docker, take this to the next level. They grew out of the Linux world, and offer a hypervisor for a collection of apps that reside in the container and are protected from other containers. You can move a collection of apps or VMs or whatnot from one hypervisor to another easily, or at least more easily than you could if you didn’t have this emerging standard. If you have never heard about Docker, you might want to start by watching this 45 minute video tutorial here:
http://youtu.be/Q5POuMHxW-0
01/30/2015
Application virtualization
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Application_virtualization

"Application virtualization is software technology that encapsulates application software from the underlying operating system on which it is executed. A fully virtualized application is not installed in the traditional sense,[1] although it is still executed as if it were. The application behaves at runtime like it is directly interfacing with the original operating system and all the resources managed by it, but can be isolated or sandboxed to varying degrees."

What is VIRTUAL CONTAINER?
http://thesciencedictionary.org/virtual-container/

"A modular unit into which the payload is packaged in a synchronous digital hierarchy network, formed by adding the path overhead container identification and management information to a container of size appropriate to the source data rate."
Best answer
01/29/2015
App virtualization has been around for quite some time with products from Symantec and Microsoft, among others. The idea is that like virtual computers, you insert a small hypervisor layer that allows you to run a variety of apps in their own virtual sessions, protected from the rest of the operating system. The idea never really caught on because the virtual apps were a pain to configure.

Containers, such as Docker, take this to the next level. They grew out of the Linux world, and offer a hypervisor for a collection of apps that reside in the container and are protected from other containers. You can move a collection of apps or VMs or whatnot from one hypervisor to another easily, or at least more easily than you could if you didn’t have this emerging standard. If you have never heard about Docker, you might want to start by watching this 45 minute video tutorial here:
http://youtu.be/Q5POuMHxW-0
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