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rtrembley
Aug 05, 2011

What's the best version of Linux to learn?

I'm looking at IT jobs and a lot of them want Linux experience. What's the best one for a Windows guy to learn? I hear a lot about Ubuntu but I thought that businesses used Red Hat.

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flipper88
11/02/2013

In my nHumble opinion it would be one of the Ubuntu/Debian off shoot distributions. However, you could dive headlong in to a distrobution like Fedora/Redhat or Suse/Novel.

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flipper88
11/02/2013

In my nHumble opinion it would be one of the Ubuntu/Debian off shoot distributions. However, you could dive headlong in to a distrobution like Fedora/Redhat or Suse/Novel.

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billsdesk
12/29/2011

As a Red Hat Certified System Adminitistrator, I would recommend CentOS as the best version for preparing for the RHCSA exam. CentOS tracks the RHEL releases, without the proprietary software. Fedora is another alternate to exam preparation. If you are considering SLED certification, I would go with openSUSE. I wouldn't go with Ubuntu, as the desktop edition is too  far removed from the system administration world. Unless you are going to manage an Ubuntu server, then Upstart adds confusion to daemon management. It is nice to learn, but not part of RHEL, or SLED.

jimlynch
12/01/2011
It's hard to generalize without knowing what sort of experience you want. If you just want to get your feet wet, there are many good desktop Linux distros available.

DistroWatch always has the latest & greatest desktop distro news available. So you can start downloading different distros to test them out and learn about how to use Linux.

http://distrowatch.com

And you can use VirtualBox (free and open source software) to run these distros right in your current operating system. So you can check them out without actually installing them over your current operating system:

https://www.virtualbox.org/

You can also read reviews about various desktop distros on my blog:

http://desktoplinuxreviews.com/
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stephenb
08/05/2011

Ubuntu is good, but Red Hat has a certification program. If you want to save some money, download Fedora and then use it to take the Red Hat certification exams. Even if you don't have that much experience, it will help you to understand how Windows fits into a Linux world :P

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