Dec 17, 2014

What does having a cloud-based disaster recovery plan mean?

Best answer
12/17/2014
Most DR plans are typically based on bringing up a remote data center that shadows what is contained in your on-premises data center. But when you add the cloud you add a few new twists here:

First, you need to understand what happens if your cloud provider goes down, where else is your data kept and how redundant is the provider's own methods? Most of the major cloud providers have done a lot in this area, but still you want to understand their DR processes.

Second, you need to understand what links you have between your offices and their cloud, and whether they are redundant or not. I remember one large federal agency that had three ISPs providing connectivity to their offices in the Washington DC area. The trouble was all three had paths through one of the tunnels in Baltimore, 40 miles away. When there was a tunnel fire, they lost all connectivity (now they have four ISPs and have more information about their routes too).

Finally, you need tools that work across hybrid environments, where information in your on-premises data center is mirrored with the cloud, and understand the recovery time and the effect of the outage on these connections when disaster strikes.
12/17/2014
How to use cloud-based disaster recovery tools to prepare for the worst
http://www.networkworld.com/article/2171364/tech-primers/how-to-use-cloud-based-disaster-recovery-tools-to-prepare-for-the-worst.html

"* Step 1: If you don’t have a cloud-based disaster recovery plan for your data make this an immediate priority. If you’re not sure where to go or what to do, there are a number of resources that can help you determine what would be best for business. For starters check out BITS, an open community whose Standard Information Questionnaire is a great way to evaluate cloud providers. Natural disasters are never convenient and don’t adhere to a 9-to-5 schedule. So you opt to work with a managed service provider make sure they have support staff on call 24/7/365.

* Step 2: If your business already has a DR plan, ensure your staff knows exactly what to do, who to call, and how to get your systems and data back in the event of an outage. Prepare your business for a natural disaster as you would your family. Remember, you can’t stop the inevitable but you can prepare for it and recovery from it.

* Step 3: Check the status of your off-site data backups and confirm that your company’s backed-up data copy is current and error-free. The best way to do this is to ensure your business is using a hybrid solution of on-premise software and off-site cloud solutions. Weather can damage buildings, but the cloud can weather the storm.

* Step 4: Check to make sure your remote recovery site (data center or cloud) is operational and updated with current servers, data, network connectivity, etc. Again, the ideal backup and recovery solution implements the cloud, which ensures significantly faster backups than tape or disk and allows for increased customization."
Best answer
12/17/2014
Most DR plans are typically based on bringing up a remote data center that shadows what is contained in your on-premises data center. But when you add the cloud you add a few new twists here:

First, you need to understand what happens if your cloud provider goes down, where else is your data kept and how redundant is the provider's own methods? Most of the major cloud providers have done a lot in this area, but still you want to understand their DR processes.

Second, you need to understand what links you have between your offices and their cloud, and whether they are redundant or not. I remember one large federal agency that had three ISPs providing connectivity to their offices in the Washington DC area. The trouble was all three had paths through one of the tunnels in Baltimore, 40 miles away. When there was a tunnel fire, they lost all connectivity (now they have four ISPs and have more information about their routes too).

Finally, you need tools that work across hybrid environments, where information in your on-premises data center is mirrored with the cloud, and understand the recovery time and the effect of the outage on these connections when disaster strikes.
Answer this