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mandril
Jul 20, 2014

How can I get around Verizon’s throttling of Netflix and see decent quality streaming video?

Yes, I know that Verizon says that they don’t throttle Netflix. I also know that watching Netflix on Verizon FiOS with 50+mbps download speeds is nearly impossible at times, so there is something going on. Is there any way to get around the throttling (or whatever Verizon wants to call it that makes them not sound like bad actors) and actually watch a decent quality Netflix video? If I could even get 2Mbps I would be happy, but I’m seeing speeds more like 300kbps when I try to watch Netflix.

jimlynch
07/24/2014
Tired of Netflix Throttling by Verizon FiOS and Other ISPs?
http://www.flashrouters.com/blog/2014/06/25/tired-netflix-throttling-ver...

"If Verizon cannot see you are using a specific streaming video or music service, then how can they throttle Netflix or Pandora or Hulu or WatchESPN. will hopefully not occur. When changing your IP and encrypting your connection to avoid monitoring by cable companies, it would be best to keep the new IP address close to your current location, to prevent the VPN from slowing down. Most providers have a large amount of US addresses but certain providers have a large amount of locations you can connect to enabling you to encrypt your connection and activity with limited loss of speed from doing it.

The VPN providers with the most abundant high speed servers in the US include HideMyAss (300+ servers in 34 states) IPVanish (40+ servers in 11 states) & Proxy.sh (50+ Servers in 18 states)."
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ehtan
07/23/2014

You are not alone. Here is the link to a video someone made where he is getting 235kbps while trying to play Netflix over a 75Mbps FiOS connection. It’s absurd. Watch through the video and see what happens when he connects to Netflix through a VPN, with everything else unchanged. I’ll give you a hint: Suddenly Netflix is streaming at its max rate of 3Mbps. A VPN may be your only option until Verizon either gets their act together and starts actually honoring the peering agreement that they forced Netflix to pay them for, or the FCC steps in and finally puts a stop to ISPs throttling the content that their customers actually want to access. I wouldn’t hold my breath for the later. 

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ehtan
07/23/2014

Oops, forgot the link to the video: http://youtu.be/5vs3QhEx_3w

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